Resumes on Personal Websites

2 Comments

Always know where your target candidates are! If you are sourcing for certain roles, they may be likely to have their own website with a resume. I have found that people on the front-end of web development and some marketers will have their own sites with personal information. Let’s take a look at how to farm out this information.

The challenge with this search is getting around sites that provide resume services.

To start, target your Boolean towards resumes. People may use “resume” or a similar word, such as curriculum vitae (cv), portfolio, or have an “about me” section. What other terms do you find people use? Always pay attention to the vernacular you see being used and incorporate it into your search string.

On Google, you can use the “inurl” designator; “intitle” is another option. Remember that the title of a webpage is that part that appears in the tab of the web browser. In many blogs the information will be redundant. For example, on WordPress (where this blog is written), the title of the blog will be incorporated into the title of the page and the url.

The base of my Boolean looks something like this:

inurl:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact | intitle:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact

This is the base, so it is replacing the xray or site search portion of my Boolean string. I will try and keep it towards the back of my Boolean string. We will need to evaluate if it is necessary to include spaces between the keywords. If so, the search string is going to be much longer:

inurl:resume | inurl:cv | inurl:vitae | inurl:portfolio | inurl:about | inurl:contact | intitle:resume | intitle:cv | intitle:vitae | intitle:portfolio | intitle:about | intitle:contact

FILETYPE

Next, we will target the file the resume (or equivalent) is created in. This may not be necessary if you are targeting someone’s profile information. However, I have seen many times people load a pdf version of their resume onto the website instead of having the resume as a separate page. They may have both. What is more prevelant in the field you are sourcing? You will want to try the search with and without the following portion of the search string:

filetype:pdf | filetype:docx | filetype:doc

The operator “filetype” works on both Bing and Google.

Let’s put together what we have so far:

filetype:pdf | filetype:docx | filetype:doc inurl:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact | intitle:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact

As you can see, false positives, mostly about writing resumes, are returning.

resume1

LOCATION

For the location portion of the search string, I am going to use a zip code search and a city name search. For this example, I will use Nashville, TN. When searching zip codes, I like to use www.mapszipcodes.com. To find the appropriate codes, I use a site search coupled with the name of the city:

site:mapszipcode.com nashville

resume2

Click on the top link and we get this list:

resume3

Zip codes are listed sequentially, and in this case, range from 37201 to 37250. The issue with this technique, is that it does not include the surrounding areas of Nashville. If you source within a specific field, you will want to invest the time to get a more accurate range of zip codes.

We might also include an area code portion to the search. The area code in Nashville is 615.

We will represent this portion of the search in our string with the following:

37201..37250 | nashville | 615

Add that to what we currently have:

37201..37250 | nashville | 615 filetype:pdf | filetype:docx | filetype:doc inurl:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact | intitle:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact

resume4

I am actually seeing “contact” more than I would like. I might remove that from my Boolean, as long as I am searching for resumes. I might leave it in if it is pointing me to appropriate people to contact!

You will notice that we already have a pretty long string, and we haven’t even added any keywords to our search! To shorten the string, I may remove the inurl or intitle portion.

KEYWORDS

And finally, keywords! For this example, let’s take a look at User Experience Designers.

uxd | ixd | “user experience” | “interaction design” | hci | “human computer interaction” 37201..37250 | nashville | 615 filetype:pdf | filetype:docx | filetype:doc inurl:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact | intitle:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|about|contact

This only has one section of keywords, yet we get some decent results:

resume5

It looks like some false positives are course material related to the term “human computer interaction.” Curriculum vitae is also commonly used for a course syllabus.

Also, since the base of my search string has moved so far down, it is not being weighted as much as I would like. I am going to rearrange the information a little and see if that helps with my results.

inurl:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|contact | intitle:resume|cv|vitae|portfolio|contact uxd | ixd | “user experience” | “interaction design” 37201..37250 | nashville | 615 filetype:pdf | filetype:docx | filetype:doc 

This is actually giving some pretty good results. We hit on someone’s WordPress site, a couple of personal websites named after the person, and our false positive is a doc file.

resume6

There are some tweaks I might make to the string: remove some portions , add some more keyword sections, perhaps only look for pdf files, but I think you get the general idea here.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

To summarize, we want to include the following sections in our search string:

  • filetype
  • inurl or intitle target for resume
  • location
  • keywords

Remember, you can change the order of your sections depending on how the results are returning. If you want something weighted more, put it closer to the beginning of the search string.

Pay attention to your results. You want to match your search string to how people are using search terms. For example, I saw a few times that the term “vita” was being used instead of “vitae”. I would adjust my string accordingly. If this is something that people are doing in Nashville, I am going to search Nashville using the correct terms.

If you search a particular area frequently, take the time to uncover an all encompassing zip code and area code list. With our Nashville example, I know that the surrounding suburbs are not included in the list used. This is going to leave out a lot of results. Therefore, I would want to research the surrounding areas and their zip codes and area codes to include into my search.

Be creative; be perceptive; and adjust as necessary! Don’t be afraid to share; let me know how you personalize this type of search.

Happy hunting!

Advertisements

Finding Phone Numbers

5 Comments

I am asked quite frequently how to find a phone number through Boolean searches. Finding that perfect candidate is not enough! We MUST be able to get in contact with them. Unfortunately, the days of having a home phone number listed in the Yellow Pages are behind us. Many people are using their cell phones as their only contact number. Of course, we can find where the person works and make the cold call into their place of employment, but many recruiters are uncomfortable with that notion. The best we can hope for is they will answer at their desk and give us their personal number.

Before we get started, remember, we can only find what is out there. Unless the candidate has listed their phone number at some time on the internet, we will not be able to locate it! But, there is a chance. I would like to share with you my process of finding a phone number. It does not always work, but it is always worth  looking!

First, I start my search with a simple Google search. From a LinkedIn profile, we know the person’s approximate location and name. Do a simple area code search for the location. I am going to use my own information for this example.  I am currently located in Huntsville, AL.

NOTE: You may also want to include the area codes of previous locations. I have lived in New Jersey and Texas. It is possible that I got a cell phone at one of those locations and never bothered to change my number when I moved.

I enter into Google:

huntsville alabama area codes

phone1

From this, I learn that the area codes in Huntsville, AL are 256 and 938.

My next Boolean will simply be the name of the person and an OR string of the area codes.

“erin page” 256|938

phone2

The very first result is a good result (sort of) for me. This was my last number on AT&T before I switched to Verizon. The address is on target as well.

Further down the list we see zoominfo.com. This can sometimes give you a bit of information. They have my work info.

phone3

I find something interesting on Page 4 of the results.

phone4

This is where I created a location on FourSquare for my mechanic. The phone number is his office number. However, we do know each other personally, and he just might get a message to me. You never know!

Also on Page 4, my work colleague has a listing with the office number.

phone5

That is a pretty simple search! I have a two other tactics I often use as well. ZoomInfo wants you to pay for their information. However, as we saw above, they will sometimes give you a few digits and X out the remaining digits. With just a few digits, you can search for the remainder.

I use 2 sites for X-ray searches on phone numbers: verifyphone.com and 411.info. Remember, only what is on the internet can be found, so this may be somewhat of a crap shoot. However, I have had SOME luck.

I know this does not work for my personal info, but my Boolean would look something like this:

site:verifyphone.com | site:411.info “erin page” 256

phone6

As you can see, there are not any results for my number. But, I do want to open up one of the pages just so you can see what is on them.

This is from verifyphone.com:

phone7

As you can see, many numbers do NOT have a name associated with them. However, some DO. And you just might be lucky enough that that someone is who you are attempting to recruit.

Here is what the a link to 411.info looks like:

phone8

Finding a phone number can take some creativity. I was once able to find someone because his wife ran an in-home daycare. She listed their home phone. I first found them through ZoomInfo with several digits missing. I entered his name and the digits that were available. And BAM! Phone number. =-) You will be so excited to call the candidate at this point! I sure was!

Let me know what strategies YOU use to find phone numbers and how my techniques work for you!

Happy Hunting!